New Victory Blog

The New Victory Blog is a place to learn more about New York's theater for families and the shows we produce. Find out what we do and what we're passionate about—exploring the arts as a family.
February 15, 2018

Family Activity: William Shakespeare's Long Lost First Play (abridged)

Give yourself a Shakespearean look, play a "Bard Game" with family and friends and put your own twist on some Shakespearean classics in this Family Activity for William Shakespeare's Long Lost First Play (abridged)! For each show in the season, we post a new Family Activity. You can find all of our past Family Activities here on our blog and at

Ruff Around the Edges

In this activity, you'll create your very own look inspired by the Bard himself. 

Materials: Coffee filters, stapler, scissors, hole punch, string

Step One: Measure your string so that it comfortably fits around your neck with a little bit of room. 

Step Two: Fold your coffee filter in half and then fold it in half again. 

Making the Ruff

Making the Ruff

Step Three: Staple the side that isn't ruffly, approximately 1.5 inches from the edge.

Making the Ruff

Step Four: Make a hole using your hole punch or scissors on the bottom corner of your filter, below the staple. 

Making the Ruff

Step Five: Cut off the pointy bottom of the folded coffee filter 

Making the Ruff

Step Six: You will repeat steps one to five as many times as it takes to fill the string around your neck with coffee filters. Think of it like making a necklace! Loop all of your folded coffee filters onto your string and tie the string around your neck. Fluff out the ruff, and tada! You're ready to write your next play. You could even wear your new ruff to William Shakespeare's Long Lost First Play (abridged)!

Making the Ruff

Making the Ruff

The Bard Game

This is a game made of mini-Shakespearean challenges that are very similar to games that you already know and love. Get ready to challenge with your family, using your wit and imagination!

Materials: Bard Game Template, game cards, scissors, timer

Step One: Print out the following The Bard Game

Create your own cards for the "Who Am I?" and "How Many Can You Name?" challenges. Fill these in with your own ideas.

Step Two: Learn how to play the game and create your cards.

Game Rules: 
  • This is a two player game. Once completed, the next player can challenge the winner! The youngest player begins the game.
  • The first player moves to the first place and plays the mini challenge indicated on the space.
  • If you win the mini game, you move forward. If you do not win, then you stay to try again during your next turn.
  • The first player to get to the end wins.
Mini Challenge Rules:

Who Am I?
  • Set your timer for 60 seconds.
  • Pick up a card and place it on your forehead (no peeking!)
  • The other player gives you clues about which Shakespearean character is on your card. They're not allowed to rhyme the name or spell it out.
  • If you guess it before the 60 seconds are up, move to the next space!
How Many Can You Name?
  • Set your timer for 60 seconds.
  • Pick a card and read the number and category written on it. Then, list subjects from the category. How many? As many as the card indicates! Imagine that it says "six heroines." You would then list six of Shakespeare's heroines—Beatrice, Hero, Juliet, Portia, Titania and Viola
  • If you can name the amount written on the card, move forward!
  • Each player gets a card.
  • Set your timer for 60 seconds and begin the battle. The player whose turn it is goes second in this challenge.
  • Players must explain why and how their character will win a duel with the other, based on creative thinking and the information on the card. 
  • The one with the most believable story is victorious!
  • EXAMPLE: I pull up a Juliet: Poison card. My opponent pulls a Hamlet: Knife card. My opponent argues that Hamlet would win over Juliet, because of his weapon. I will argue that Juliet poisoned him before the duel even began!
Step Three: Challenge your family and friends. 

Say It Like You Meme It
In this activity you will read some quotes from Shakespeare's best known plays and put your own twist on them.

Step One: Pick one of the following Shakespearean quotes

Quote Bank: 

"To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them. To die: to sleep;"
—Hamlet, Hamlet

"This above all: to thine own self be true,
And it must follow, as the night the day,
Thou canst not then be false to any man."
—Polonius, Hamlet

"Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage,
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing."
—Macbeth, Macbeth

"My words fly up, my thoughts remain below:
Words without thoughts never to heaven go."
—King Claudius, Hamlet

"Ay me, for aught that I could ever read,
Could ever hear by tale or history,
The course of true love never did run smooth,
But either it was different in blood—"
—Hermia, A Midsummer Night’s Dream

"Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,
And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind."
—Helena, A Midsummer Night's Dream

"One fairer than my love? The all-seeing sun
Ne'er saw her match since first the world begun"
—Romeo, Romeo and Juliet

"Good Night, Good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow, that I shall say good night till it be morrow."
—Juliet, Romeo and Juliet

Step Two: Move around the word order or add some words of your own to completely change the meaning.

Real Quote: "Good Night, Good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow, that I shall say good night till it be morrow." Juliet, Romeo and Juliet
New Quote: "Night, night! Partying is such sweet sorrow, that I shall say night night till it be morrow."

Step Three: Think of a character from any of your favorite books, movies or TV series saying the new quote you just created. Search an image of that character, save it and put into this meme generator with the new quote your created. How much did the quote change now? 

Long Lost First Play Thumb That's right, the "Bad Boys of Abridgement" are back! Uproarious and rapid-fire, the Reduced Shakespeare Company makes sharp, short comedy in their latest sendup, spinning the Bard's 39 plays into a fast, funny and fictional 40th. Get your tickets today!

Posted by Beth Henderson
Blog post currently doesn't have any comments.
 Security code