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New Victory Blog

The New Victory Blog is a place to learn more about New York's theater for families and the shows we produce. Find out what we do and what we're passionate about—exploring the arts as a family.

At The New Victory Theater, we prepare New York City kids aged 16-19 for future academic and career success with a three-year program called the New Victory Usher Corps. Pairing mentorship and life skills workshops with jobs in the arts, the Usher Corps takes pride in the talented and diverse group of young adults who help New Vic families have the very best experience at our theater. 

Shemar Pelzer is in his second year as an usher. He is currently a senior at Brooklyn Lab High School where he helps coach the women's softball team, plays baseball and actively participates in the stepping community. He's looking forward to college applications and is excited about all the shows this season, especially Step Afrika!'s The Migration this November. This past summer, he worked closely with the New Victory Education Department and here, Courtney J. Boddie, Director of Education, School Engagement, sits down with Shemar to talk about how his life has changed #BecauseofArtsEd.

This post was originally seen on AmericansfortheArts.org.
 

Shemar PelzerC: Thanks for being here, Shemar! You've been an Usher for two years, and over the summer you worked on Victory Dance, which features NYC-based dance companies in performances curated for kids. What pulled you to this program? 

S: Im really interested in dance and when I heard about the performances, it sounded really well put together. The artistry was really amazing. Penelope, a New Vic Teaching Artist, introduced me to Ronald K. Brown, one of the Victory Dance choreographers, because she knew I admired his work. It felt surreal to be able to compliment his work in person. He's inspired me so much and I can't wait to take a class with him so I can learn more and show him my dedication. 

C: That's awesome—what a wonderful and unexpected outcome. How would you describe the kids reaction to the dance pieces?

S: I think that the kids really loved it. There have been times when I've been in the house and have seen kids moving and they couldn't stop. Kids are very creative and they love stuff like this. A lot of them had never seen dance before and it's exciting for them, and it was just as thrilling for me to see their experience. 

C: Yeah, a lot of kids aren't used to seeing contemporary dance and how it's connected to the social and cultural dances they already do. That's why we have these conversations with the kids in between each performance—we find that their responses were really insightful. How are you involved in the arts, how have the arts been present in your life? 

S: At age nine I started dancing and putting on little shows. My sisters were dancers so I followed in their footsteps. In middle school, stepping coach Kenneth Armstead visited and gave a demonstration. I immediately decided that I needed to join his group. After about a year he started a new group and I became one of the four founding members of the team. In our first competition we got second, then third, then we started winning first place. Suddenly, we were regional champions for three years! The team really inspired me to really push my limits. I had to take advantage of the opportunities that a lot of kids don't have and really go for it. 

Later, the team fell apart. It was really devastating for me. I took a year off because I couldn't even think of performing anymore. But then, I met another dance team that my friend was a part of and I tried out and I made it! Learning this style of dance was completely outside of my comfort zone. How they moved and choreographed was so different, but I totally fell in love with it. The type of dance is called Underground, made up of reggae, hard core, girly and pumping. While hard core's my favorite, pumping was a bigger challenge because it requires a lot of arm movement and my arms were so stiff from years of stepping. Now, I study three main categories—stepping, hip hop and African. I've also tried a little bit of salsa. 

C: As I was watching you tell this story, this is the most animated that I've seen you. When people engage in the arts, it's like a light turns on inside of them. It seems like dance is a really exciting thing for you and it really helps you engage. 

S: As a kid, you see a show and you can just learn by watching. The idea of how arts are made and what it takes to create art—all of those skills can apply to other things. Through dance and through my work with the Usher Corps, I've seen a lot of growth in my willingness to be more open to different things, seize opportunities and speak to different people. I recognize that this will help me in the future and I want to share that with others. 

Ushers at Work
 
C: I agree, our goal isn't necessarily to make kids into artists. We want kids to know that there are careers in the arts, but we're not trying to get kids into the arts. Even with the Ushers, we want them to have performing arts in their lives but they don't have to be career artists. 

S: Kids really do know what they want and sometimes the arts help to tap into that. If they think they want to start dancing because of Victory Dance, nothing stands in their way. If they experience arts for the first time as a New Victory Usher, who knows what they'll see in themselves. 

C: I hear you're an advocate for the Usher Corps; what do you tell people and why do you share this opportunity with others?

S: I'm a very open-minded and open-hearted person. If someone is in need of something, I want to try to help them out. I tell people about how it's a three-year program that helps you get ready for the world. I say it requires dedication and the ability to adapt and learn what's going on to take advantage of all the program can offer you. 

I like to see the Usher Corps as a job readiness program, where you get prepared to start your career. There are different things that the New Victory helps you learn that other jobs wouldn't. When you have an opportunity like this, you just have to take it. You never know how you'll grow!

C: It's like you get out of the program what you put into it. The fact that you're a dancer, that you're willing to go outside of your own community and comfort zone and share your craft and talk to people about your job—you're being both an artist and an advocate. 

S: Performing in the arts is like a ministry—there's a lot of outreach when you go out and visit kids going through hard situations. Your work and your performance shows different kinds of representations or ideas that may inspire them. 

C: Why do you think arts and arts education are important for kids?

S: When exposed to the arts, kids experience new and different things. They can develop entirely new interests from it, because kids are very creative. The arts help kids learn about passion, dedication and what they want to do in the future. Even if they want to be something like a doctor or a lawyer, the arts teach specific skills that help them reach their goals. 
 
 
Courtney J. Boddie
Courtney J. Boddie, New Victory Director of Education/School Engagement, oversees the New Victory Education Partnership program and professional development training in the performing arts for teachers. Ms. Boddie was President of the Association of Teaching Artists (ATA) from 2015 to 2017 and is currently on the Board of Directors. Additionally, she serves on the Teaching Artist Committee of the NYC Arts in Education Roundtable, the editorial board for the Teaching Artist Journal and is a member of the National Teaching Artist Collective in association with the National Guild for Community Arts Education. She is an adjunct professor at New York University and The New School. Prior to joining The New Victory Theater in 2003, Ms. Boddie was Program Associate for Empire State Partnerships (NYSCA) and a teaching artist for Roundabout Theatre Company. She received her Master's degree from the Educational Theatre Graduate Program at New York University.

 
Posted by Beth Henderson

One of the most bittersweet moments of the New Victory Season is when we bid a fond farewell to the graduating third-years of the New Victory Usher Corps. This program is more than professional development. It's a family. Here at The New 42nd Street, we take pride in our graduates' achievements, whether it's greeting New Vic audiences or growing life-skills at educational workshops.
 
The 2016-17 Ushers The 2016-17 Ushers
The New Victory Usher Corp, created to address the urgent need for youth employment in New York City, offers paid employment, job training, academic support and mentorship for 50 young New Yorkers each year. (They also throw excellent, annual holiday parties too!) Every usher has a different experience, and we work with each of them to ensure that they are both nurtured and challenged during their time with us.

Richard Lascelles first came to the Usher Corps as a soft-spoken high schooler, but by his second year he was ready to lead. During Fly, a play about the Tuskeegee Airmen, Richard volunteered to chaperone one of the three Airmen who attended the show and Talk-Back. Even after his graduation ceremony, he looks back on this opportunity fondly, as it helped him come into his own as a professional and leader.

 

A career panel A career panel for the New Victory Usher Corps with Mario Batali, Sade Williams and James Fuentes
Richard says "The Usher Corps opened my eyes to what I want to do in the near future … I thank the Usher Corps for pushing me to my full potential, and reminding me what I am good at."

Brendon Muniz, a third-year graduate of the Usher Corps program who starts at NYU in the fall, agrees, "The Usher Corps allowed me to grow as a person and show me the importance of making new connections and making sure you show your best self to others. Not only did I have a job, but I also had mentors teach me how to interview, how to get another job, and how to do better in school." 

In the past three years, we were lucky to call these graduates both coworkers and friends—Rachel Pang (Brooklyn College), Brendan Muniz (New York University), Cynthia Arce (John Jay College), Aniyah Carr, Donovan Molina (Hostos College), Dylan Christou (St Joseph's College), Richard Lascelles (Monroe College), Jaixa Lopez (Borough of Manhattan Community College), Nelson Malone (Kingsborough Community College), John DeLoatch (LaGuardia Community College) and Stephanie Cuevas (New York City College of Technology). We hope they look back with warm hearts, remembering the professional workshops, birthday parties and job training seminars. They'll always have a home here at The New Victory Theater, and we're thrilled to see what they accomplish in the future.
 
Posted by Beth Henderson
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